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Landscape mississippi

Landscape mississippi


Much of what is known today about ancient Native American cultures of the Lower Mississippi Valley LMV stems from studies of sites with earthen mounds, along with ceramic artifacts that have provided a major source of cultural-historical information. Phillips et al. This includes the area north of the Arkansas River, subsequently referred to as the Central Mississippi Valley. Northern and southern segments of the LMV have long been distinguished largely on the basis of ceramics, separated around the Arkansas Lowland. This article focuses on Native American communities of the southern LMV during the centuries following the Middle Woodland or Marksville period AD 1— , although the northern LMV and earlier periods are mentioned in comparative context. Mark A.

Content:
  • History and Culture of the Mississippi Delta Region
  • America's Most Desperate Landscape
  • Heritage and history afford Mississippi unique place in literary landscape
  • Best Plants for Mississippi Landscapes
  • Press Releases
  • East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography
  • Mississippi
  • Stunning Landscapes & Outdoor Living
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History and Culture of the Mississippi Delta Region

The meta-geography of the conterminous United States is often dominated by an image of densely inhabited, intensively productive coastlines those abutting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, but also those along the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico ; and a sparsely inhabited, largely agricultural interior of lower economic intensity. Landscapes of primary agricultural production, largely waterborne circulation, and waste disposal.

It is through the various assemblies of these operational landscapes that the Mississippi Basin constitutes the basis for the material economy of the US, and, to a certain extent for commodity flows of the world.

If the agricultural productivity of the landscape is the foremost process of operationalization across the basin, the second is the circulation of mostly dry-bulk, primary commodities, including, but not limited to, agricultural products. The map in figure 3 reflects the general distribution of flows of freight traffic across the US, both road traffic trucks and waterborne traffic.

The historical importance of the Mississippi network of waterways is still prevalent as waterborne freight transport remains by far the most cost-effective option, especially when transporting bulky commodities with low value to weight ratios , which characterize the productive output of the region agricultural products, chemicals, fuels, minerals. But as processes of operationalization intensify in the constant search of profit, the capacities of natural systems to support them are gradually exhausted and need to be compensated through recurring investment and eventual capital intensification: fertilizer inputs substitute the lost fertility of the soil, while constant drainage is required to sustain navigational depth across the waterways.

At the same time, efforts to expand this capacity often lead to further degradation. As the underlying logic of operationalization is driven by the search for profit, the hyper-productivity of the region yields questionable results. The metabolism of the agroindustrial system offers a lucid example: While agricultural yields continue to rise, the region is barely producing any food.

In fact, to a large extent, the Mississippi Basin is turning into an energy landscape, characterized by a quite paradoxical metabolism: as large quantities of synthetic nitrogen fertilizers need to be diffused over the Cornbelt to compensate for the exhausted fertility of the soil, tons of fertilizers are shipped through the Mississippi transport network, from the fertilizer processing and mixing plants that are stitched along it, and which are interwoven with the pipelines providing their main input: natural gas.

In this rather absurd cycle, one form of energy natural gas , is eventually turned into another biofuel , having been transmitted through nitrogen fertilizers and plants. This map overlays nitrogen deposition along the watersheds with the location of natural gas pipelines and fertilizer plants, disclosing this irrational interplay that is facilitated through subsides and regulatory frameworks aiming to address agricultural surpluses and trade crises.

Grasping the structure and dimensions of the material economy requires a critical interrogation of the main devices through which trade and production are monitored—frameworks that are often geared towards the measurement of only economic value, obscuring the associated negative externalities, both social and ecological, and thus accommodating their spatial and temporal displacement in the search for profit.

Operational landscapes are thus revealed as profit landscapes, based on the appropriation, not so much of human, but of extra-human work. As the capacity of nature to contribute free work is gradually exhausted, operational landscapes reveal the limits of dominant modes of development and pose questions to the limits of capitalism as a whole.

This atlas reflects the work of the mapping workshop organized during the Anthropocene River Campus that took place in New Orleans in November , which aimed to reveal the structure of the material economy across parts of Mississippi by mapping the flows of commodities in and out of the state of Louisiana. Workshop participants introduced a series of items, which had to be classified according to the standard commodity classification systems, the 5-digit Standard Classification of Transported Goods SCTG.

Using as a background the general description of the operational properties of the basin provided by the maps in figures , and the latest version of the US Commodity Flow Survey and the Freight Analysis Framework US Census and Bureau of Transportation Statistics, , the workshop mapped the weight and volume of domestic and international imports and exports from and to the state of Louisiana for 15 different categories of commodities, shown in the form of an Atlas.

While by no means complete, this exploration offered a glimpse into the structure of trade around Louisiana, but above all interrogated the potentials, limitations, and underlying logics of bureaucratic data surveys and geospatial data, highlighting how operational landscapes are also geospatial data constructs.

Unless specified otherwise all content is licensed under the following Creative Commons license Attribution — Non-Commercial — No Derivatives 4.

May 25, —Population density in white gradient, and the Mississippi river watershed in orange. Map by Nikos Katsikis.

Distribution of the agricultural production areas of major crops across the Mississippi basin. Landscapes of Operationalization. Agricultural Production in the Midwest. By Nikos Katsikis. Volumes of road and waterborne freight transport across the Mississippi basin. Elements of nitrogen operationalization across the Mississippi basin.

Louisiana Commodity Flows Atlas. Contact Privacy Policy Imprint.


America's Most Desperate Landscape

The meta-geography of the conterminous United States is often dominated by an image of densely inhabited, intensively productive coastlines those abutting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, but also those along the Great Lakes and the Gulf of Mexico ; and a sparsely inhabited, largely agricultural interior of lower economic intensity. Landscapes of primary agricultural production, largely waterborne circulation, and waste disposal. It is through the various assemblies of these operational landscapes that the Mississippi Basin constitutes the basis for the material economy of the US, and, to a certain extent for commodity flows of the world. If the agricultural productivity of the landscape is the foremost process of operationalization across the basin, the second is the circulation of mostly dry-bulk, primary commodities, including, but not limited to, agricultural products. The map in figure 3 reflects the general distribution of flows of freight traffic across the US, both road traffic trucks and waterborne traffic. The historical importance of the Mississippi network of waterways is still prevalent as waterborne freight transport remains by far the most cost-effective option, especially when transporting bulky commodities with low value to weight ratios , which characterize the productive output of the region agricultural products, chemicals, fuels, minerals. But as processes of operationalization intensify in the constant search of profit, the capacities of natural systems to support them are gradually exhausted and need to be compensated through recurring investment and eventual capital intensification: fertilizer inputs substitute the lost fertility of the soil, while constant drainage is required to sustain navigational depth across the waterways.

Much of what is known today about ancient Native American cultures of the Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) stems from studies of sites with earthen mounds.

Heritage and history afford Mississippi unique place in literary landscape

The Mississippi River watershed, with all of its tributaries, ranges from the Rockies to the Alleghenies and from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. It drains three-fifths of the continent, including thirty-one states and two Canadian provinces. Of its hundreds of tributaries, forty—five are navigable for at least fifty miles, providing a system of waterways that exceeds 15, miles in length. The Mississippi River proper is navigable from the Falls of St. Anthony Minneapolis to the Gulf of Mexico. The volume of water discharged in the Gulf of Mexico varies, ranging from ca. The exhibit traces the route of the Mississippi from its source at Lake Itasca through many of its cities:. Throughout the history of this country the Mississippi has served as a route for travel and transport of its peoples.

Best Plants for Mississippi Landscapes

Section 2. Purpose, Intent, and Definitions. The purpose of this ordinance is to provide for the orderly and aesthetic development of the City and to promote the health, safety and general welfare of the community. It is the intent of this ordinance to achieve the following:. Definitions I.

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Press Releases

Any amount helps us keep producing quality journalism for Mississippi. Enter your email address or see our other free newsletter options. We do not sell or share your information with anyone. An unsolved murder amidst one bloody riot. Crumpled notes smuggled from within Parchman prison. A controversial textbook that spurred a ban and lawsuit.

East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography

Official websites use. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites. This complex mosaic supports diverse aquatic and terrestrial plant communities, over fish species; 40 freshwater mussel species; 50 amphibian and reptile species; and over bird species, many of which use the UMRS as a critical migratory route. The river and floodplain are also hotspots for biogeochemical activity as the river-floodplain collects and processes nutrients derived from the UMR basin. Two centuries of land-use change, including construction for navigation and conversion of large areas to agriculture, has altered the broad-scale structure of the river and changed local environmental conditions in many areas. Such changes have affected rates of nutrient processing and transport, as well as the abundance of various fish, mussel, plant, and bird species. However, the magnitude and spatial scale of these effects are not well quantified, especially in regards to the best methods and locations for restoring various aspects of the river ecosystem. The U.

who spent the majority of his career on the Mississippi Gulf Coast documenting the local culture and landscape through his artwork.

Mississippi

These plants are proven successes in landscapes throughout Mississippi and the South. Choose one of these award-winning plants to add beauty to your Southern landscape and garden. To promote the use of Mississippi-grown plants, the Mississippi Medallion Program annually recognizes three to five plants that perform exceptionally well throughout the state. Plant selections are evaluated by a committee and introduced to wholesale growers and Nursery Certified Professionals through MNLA's educational programs that promote their proper use in local landscapes.

Stunning Landscapes & Outdoor Living

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Ever been asked to pick out the best-looking clouds in the sky? Rick finds it just as hard to pick out his favourite plants. Ever-optimistic, he sees every plant as beautiful and useful in some way or another, and his list of favorites changes with the seasons. Rick expect plants to have several dependable characteristics before he will use them in his own garden or recommend them to others:.

Individuals and businesses rely on the Mississippi for transportation, water, food, recreation, and a variety of goods and services. Over the last 75 years, commercial activity, development, and storms have degraded this essential ecosystem, threatening the environment, culture, and economy.

People have lived on the land now called Mississippi for at least 12, years. Native Americans have lived on the land for thousands of years. Tribes in Mississippi have included the Biloxi , Chickasaw , Choctaw , and Natchez lived on the land. In Spanish explorer Alonso Alvarez de Pineda became the first European to map the area, but over a hundred years later French explorer Sieur de la Salle claimed the land for France. Soon after, European settlers established the slave trade in this area. In Mississippi became a U.

Olson and Lois Wright Morton full-color pages, 8. Their shifting paths have shaped and reshaped the landscapes through which they flow and the confluences where their sediment-laden waters co-mingle on the voyage to the Gulf of Mexico. Changing climates and extreme weather events over the millennia have carved new channels through river bottomlands, leaving rock-exposed uplands and fertile valleys behind while altering the location where the Ohio and Mississippi rivers meet.


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